Download The Collected Works of C. G. Jung, Vol. 9, Part 1: The by Carl Gustav Jung, William McGuire, Herbert Read, Michael PDF

By Carl Gustav Jung, William McGuire, Herbert Read, Michael Fordham, Gerhard Adler

Essays which kingdom the basics of Jung's mental procedure: "On the Psychology of the subconscious" and "The relatives among the Ego and the Unconscious," with their unique types in an appendix.

Show description

Read or Download The Collected Works of C. G. Jung, Vol. 9, Part 1: The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious PDF

Similar behavioral sciences books

Science and Social Science: An Introduction

Is social technology quite a technological know-how in any respect, and if that is so in what experience? this can be the 1st genuine query that any direction at the philosophy of the social sciences needs to take on. during this short advent, Malcolm Williams supplies the scholars the grounding that would allow them to debate the problems concerned with self assurance.

Man and His Symbols

Illustrated all through with revealing photos, this can be the 1st and simply paintings during which the world-famous Swiss psychologist explains to the layperson his significantly influential idea of symbolism as printed in desires.

The Collected Works of C. G. Jung, Vol. 9, Part 1: The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious

Essays which kingdom the basics of Jung's mental procedure: "On the Psychology of the subconscious" and "The relatives among the Ego and the Unconscious," with their unique types in an appendix.

Additional info for The Collected Works of C. G. Jung, Vol. 9, Part 1: The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious

Sample text

He is the enlightener, the master and teacher, a psychopomp whose personification even Nie­ tzsche, that breaker of tablets, could not escape—for he had called up his reincarnation in Zarathustra, the lofty spirit of an almost Homeric age, as the carrier and mouthpiece of his own "Dionysian" enlightenment and ecstasy. For him God was dead, but the driving daemon of wisdom became as it were his bodily double. He himself says: Then one was changed to two And Zarathustra passed me by. 78 Zarathustra is more for Nietzsche than a poetic figure; he is an involuntary confession, a testament.

43 True, whoever looks into the mirror of the water will see first of all his own face. Whoever goes to himself risks a con­ frontation with himself. The mirror does not flatter, it faith­ fully shows whatever looks into it; namely, the face we never show to the world because we cover it with the persona, the mask of the actor. But the mirror lies behind the mask and shows the true face. 44 This confrontation is the first test of courage on the inner way, a test sufficient to frighten off most people, for the meeting with ourselves belongs to the more unpleasant things that can be avoided so long as we can project everything negative into the environment.

The forms we use for assigning meaning are historical categories that reach back into the mists of time—a fact we do not take sufficiently into account. Interpretations make use of certain linguistic matrices that are themselves derived from primordial ARCHETYPES OF THE COLLECTIVE UNCONSCIOUS images. From whatever side we approach this question, every­ where we find ourselves confronted with the history of language, with images and motifs that lead straight back to the primitive wonder-world. " It goes back to the eiSos concept of Plato, and the eternal ideas are primordial images stored up Iv vnepovpavua τοπω (in a supracelestial place) as eternal, transcendent forms.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.42 of 5 – based on 32 votes